Internet

Adding links to websites

Today I was asked for my permission to include a link to my blog on a website. Although it was very nice to be asked, there was no need as the site is in the public domain and anyone can link to it, for any purpose.
I am also happy for anyone to quote from it or use the information as long as they indicate where the information came from.

This made me think about just what is up on the Internet  that I am involved with:

There is:

  • this blog
  • my Virtual Library Catalogue and Document Depository
  • Conductive Education Press and the 4 books it has published.

The blog was started in 2008,  Conductive Education Press in 2009, and the Virtual Library in 2010

Not bad for a start!

Trouble searching the Internet?

We all use the well-known search engines such as Google, Bing, Ask Jeeves etc  to search the Internet. Today after a conversation about search engines I decided to see whether it was possible to get list(s) of  what  is available to use.

After putting in my request to Google I found a number of lists.

Here are a few, there are quite a number of others.

http://www.thesearchenginelist.com/

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/List_of_search_engines

http://www.searchenginecolossus.com/  (for international search engines, arranged by country)

These lists  include an amazing number of search engines on a variety of topics, from the law, to jobs, to blogs, to games for example and also have metasearch engines, such as Dogpile, and Zuula  which will search up to sixteen other engines for you.
One that wasn’t included was one I used to use a couple of years ago to winkle out obscure pieces on Conductive Education. This was called Bananaslug and I was reminded about it this morning by Andrew.
It can be found at http://www.bananaslug.com/ and is called a long tail search engine as it takes random words you select and uses them to find hits on a particular subject. For example, you could choose Conductive Education as your subject and add random words from one of a  number of categories listed on the site, e.g. emotions or first names for instance, to make a search.
I will have to investigate as many of these as I can and see what I can find. If you do the same, please do let me know of any items of particular interest that you consider should be included in the virtual Catalogue on http://www.e-conduction.org/

Over 200 now!

I have spent quite a bit of time entering more material into the virtual catalogue now at home on the Conduction website at
http://www.e-conduction.org/?page_id=115

To me this is quite an achievement as so many searches and checks have to be made before an item is entered, that it takes nearly an hour to do half a dozen or so. I keep finding new ones so there will be no end to this process, I am sure.
My priority has been to get things up for all to find and see; this is a big clerical task. I realise that it may not be easy to navigate round the catalogue and I will  soon be able to revise the Help sheet to make it better, make searching and using the catalogue quicker and easier.  Please do let me know if you are experiencing problems so I can incorporate the solution into the Help sheet.  So far I have had only one piece of feedback and more would be very welcome – good or critical!

Information in newspapers is not always right, is it

I check regularly for news items to include in my monthly list and have found this one today

http://topwirexs.com/children-suffering-from-cerebral-palsy-receive-assistance-from-a-center-in-lake-zurich/171636/

This reports the work of the Centre for Independence through Conductive Education as described at a Rotary Club of Lake Zurich function. It starts with an explanation of cerebral palsy and how it occurs before or during birth due to lack of oxygen; this is not my understanding. No-one really knows what causes it, lack of oxygen may be only one possibility. It is important to get facts right as wrong information in one section of an article can cast doubt on the rest of the piece.
Most  journalists and those interviewed by them, do get things right, but  perhaps everyone should check their information carefully before making such statements as that mentioned above.

New home and format for Virtual Library of Conductive Education

At long last I can announce that the Virtual Library of Conductive Education now has a new format –  and a new home, thanks to Ben Foulger.
Ben has spent a lot of his own time in the past few months creating  a searchable database for the Virtual Library  and in the process been very patient with my requests for all sorts of features, changes, yet more changes and further additions – he has managed them all. Wonderful.
Ben, I salute you!
The  catalogue can now be found on the website of Conduction, the new UK charity for Conductive Education  at
The contents of the Library currently at
will gradually be included along with new items and the same criterium  applies for those, that is availablility on the Internet. Some are free to acess and some require a subscription, password or payment for an individual article. So far items included are written e.g. articles, conference papers, documents, presentations. Films and videos may be added later.

I have added over 100 items to the catalogue so far, but as you can appreciate transferring the material from the blog to the database takes time. I will add any new finds straight into the new format – in fact I have added some already – whilst continuing to ‘move’ the old items across.

 The blog will remain and not be deleted until this process is completed.
Some people may be unused to searching a catalogue online, so there is a link to a help page containing some basic instructions and guidance.
This catalogue, like all ‘live’ library catalogues, will never be ‘finished’ as more new material becomes available and is recorded. I welcome any help you can offer in finding such material.
You will see that there is also a link to a Depository on the same page. It is hoped to put complete documents, unpublished papers, articles etc not available elsewhere into this starting very soon. At present it is empty.

As always, if you have any queries, suggestions for improving the new set-up or suggestions for inclusion, please do let me know.

Conductive Education books available on the Internet

 I was reminded the other day during a conversation with Andrew Sutton that Foundation for Conductive Education publications had been sent to Google for inclusion in Google Books with permissions to include some content.

I have now checked on this and found not only FCE titles with a large chunk of the text up on the Internet but another one that has some too. These will be included with full references and URLs in the Virtual Conductive Education Library as soon as I can get them up.

The FCE titles are

Ákos, K. and Ákos, M. (1991) Dina. Birmingham: Foundation for Conductive Education AND Ulm: Alabander Verlag.

Cottam, P. and Sutton, A., ed. (1986) Conductive Education; a system for overcoming motor disorder. London: Croom Helm.

Read, J. (1991) Conductive Education 1987-1992; the transitional years. Birmingham: Foundation for Conductive Education.

Sutton, A. (1998) Last year in Jerusalem; four presentations to an international conference. Birmingham: Foundation for Conductive Education.

Read, J. (1991 ) Come wind come weather; a study of the difficulties faced by parents taking their children to the Peto Institute in Budapest. Birmingham: Foundation for Conductive Education.

The other book is :

Brown, M. and Mikula-Toth, A. (1997) Adult Conductive Education : a practical guide. Cheltenham: Stanley Thornes.

If you wish to read the available content of these, go to Google Books and do a search for Conductive Education. The books themselves are all available from the Foundation for Conductive Education atlibrary@conductive-education.org.uk

Conductive Education books available on the Internet

 I was reminded the other day during a conversation with Andrew Sutton that Foundation for Conductive Education publications had been sent to Google for inclusion in Google Books with permissions to include some content.

I have now checked on this and found not only FCE titles with a large chunk of the text up on the Internet but another one that has some too. These will be included with full references and URLs in the Virtual Conductive Education Library as soon as I can get them up.

The FCE titles are

Ákos, K. and Ákos, M. (1991) Dina. Birmingham: Foundation for Conductive Education AND Ulm: Alabander Verlag.

Cottam, P. and Sutton, A., ed. (1986) Conductive Education; a system for overcoming motor disorder. London: Croom Helm.

Read, J. (1991) Conductive Education 1987-1992; the transitional years. Birmingham: Foundation for Conductive Education.

Sutton, A. (1998) Last year in Jerusalem; four presentations to an international conference. Birmingham: Foundation for Conductive Education.

Read, J. (1991 ) Come wind come weather; a study of the difficulties faced by parents taking their children to the Peto Institute in Budapest. Birmingham: Foundation for Conductive Education.

The other book is :

Brown, M. and Mikula-Toth, A. (1997) Adult Conductive Education : a practical guide. Cheltenham: Stanley Thornes.

If you wish to read the available content of these, go to Google Books and do a search for Conductive Education. The books themselves are all available from the Foundation for Conductive Education atlibrary@conductive-education.org.uk

Checking cookies

Even though I use my computer regularly and connect to the Internet to obtain information and maintain my blogs, I am not very good with any of the technical aspects of the hardware and software. Friends who are a bit more savvy than me often have to help out with advice and help. A piece in my local paper by Dave Pinwell about cookies has proved very useful too, and I would like to pass on the information.
One aspect I have had trouble understanding is the cookies that are small files which get put on  the PC without permission or notification when I visit websites. How this can happen I don’t know, all I know is that it does.
These cookies collect details of browsing activity and sometimes contain login, passwords and other details needed to make repeat visits to a site. These are not dangerous unless they get into the wrong hands, and the information gained could be obtained by a hacker whether cookies are held or not. So a good firewall and security protection are vital. Having these will permit proper use of cookies and any unwanted intrusion will be prevented.
You can block all cookies but this may prevent you accessing sites that you want to, so it will be worth checking your privacy levels. It is possible to delete cookies before you close the computer down and I do this regularly. You need to right click on the Internet icon, choose properties and then click on  delete for browsing history to remove all those cookies you do not want on your computer.
Thanks, Dave.

One year old today

It is exactly a year since I posted my first blog on 10 June 2008. Since then there have been enormous changes, financially and politically worldwide, and big changes for me and the Library. None of which could have been anticipated last June.

In starting this blog I hoped to publicise the National Library and its services easily and quickly, and encourage people to ask questions, request information and let me know of new documents, papers, websites , conferences etc. Since then there have been 4226 visits , now averaging about 100 per week and 99 postings – this is the hundredth – on a variety of topics. Not too bad for a blog in such a specialised field, and a ‘library’ to boot!

There have been a number of enquiries ( some in the past three months) all answered satisfactorily, and some interesting encouraging comments both on the blog and emailed privately.

What has changed?

The most important change for me personally has been my redundancy. The decision of the Foundation for Conductive Education to make the post of Librarian redundant three months ago ( yes, it is three months now!) which led to me leaving, resulted in a large number of emails and phone calls from old students, professionals, parents and conductors. They made me realise how important it was for people to know the Library and its services were there, even if they did not use them very often.

I always understood that the Library was not just for current users, not just there for students and clients at NICE, but was there as a foundation, a source of knowledge for the future, when Conductive Education would become of more interest academically worldwide. I still think that to achieve this it needs a professional to run it and increase its prestige internationally as well as that of the Foundation. I am sure that those who are manning the fort at the moment are doing the best they can, but their valuable time would be better spent doing what they know best, Conductive Education.

What next?

Well, I hope to continue disseminating information with news items, conference details, newsletters, more Conductive Education Classics, and items of relevance to those with interest in Conductive Education. Also I have registered to become part of Twitter. More of this later. I will do other things too and am looking at a couple of options.

As to the current meltdown in the financial and political world, all I can do is hope that Conductive Education and its supporters can survive and adapt to the new circumstances. For this people will need to work hard, be prepared for radical change, prepared to fight their corner and be prepared to stand up for the profession, verbally and in print.

In the meantime, please keep reading this and please, please, let me know what you think, send me your enquiries and be in touch. While its good to know that people are reading my postings, it will be even better to have more contact with you all.

Here’s to the next twelve months, and thanks for being there with me – Cheers!

Sharing information and experiences in Conductive Education via the Internet

I think that the internet has provided a number of ways of enabling people to to ‘talk’ to each other when miles apart and one of these is the discussion forum. Discussion Forums offer an ideal way for those working all over the world, sometimes alone and sometimes with others, to share experiences and ask for suggestions to help solve problems. There are several discussion forums now for Conductive Education and none appear to be very active, unlike the former forum on the Foundation for Conductive Education website was a few years ago. Is this because technology has moved on, blogs and sites such as Facebook, Myspace are the communication channels of choice now? Are conductors too busy, too tired at the end of the day/week? Are they communicating in a more private way? I would be very interested to know. Even so, I would like to note that the Conductive Education Community Discussion Forum has had some new responses to the question about what conductiors wear on their feet. Maybe this will encourage more to join in the discussion.

Earlier this year, Ben Foulger reported on his blog that there had been no use of the internet to announce the programme and record what had been presented at a recent CE conference in England.

http://geekconductor.blogspot.com/2009/03/cepeg-conference.html

As he said, this would have been very useful and of great interest to those who had been unable to attend. He asked for people to vote if they would like this to happen in the future and said he was willing to help set this up for conferences. At the end of the time allowed (which was a couple of months, I think) there were only FOUR votes (all for the motion), of which one was mine!

I know all those who work in Conductive Education are very busy and committed to it, but I hope they will try and build on these small beginnings to share the information and experiences which would benefit them all.

Do let me know what you think and of any forums you use.

Some other Discussion Forums

http://www.acersi.org/DiscussionForum.asp

Please note that the new US CE portal intends to include a discussion forum on its website but has been somewhat delayed due to technical difficulties.