Foundation for Conductive Education

Some sad news today

Today I heard about the death of Margit Balogh, former Librarian at the Peto Institute, from cancer.

She became Librarian of the Institute in 1992 and brought new life and systems to the  Institute’s collection. In a chapter written for the recent book on Dr Hári (Balogh and Dezsőné, 2014) she describes her work there under the watchful, interested eye of Mária Hári, who encouraged her  to update the procedures, re-organise the stock, and develop the use of computers,  making its holdings  more accessible.

Margit also edited the book Mária Hári and her conductive education in 2007.

In 1993 I visited the Institute and met with Margit.  We communicated through an interpreter as I knew no Hungarian and she no English, but it was an interesting meeting as we talked about the unique sources on Conductive Education held in the Institute and the beginnings of the Library I was establishing for the Foundation for Conductive Education in England.

Margit did retire some years ago but today’s users of the Library owe her a large debt for all she did for the collection, and Conductive Education.

Today is a very sad day.

 

Balogh, E and Horváth Dezsőné, (2014) Emlékkönyv, Hári, Mária 1923-2001. Budapest: Pető András Főiskola

 

Libraries, what are they for?

 Ever since I was a child I have used libraries for pleasure and information. Most people of my age that I know do the same. But how many other people actually know what they are for, and use them for this? Even students seem to struggle at times.

  • Libraries are depositories of information which is organised and arranged to make retrieval as easy and quick as possible.
  • Their contents are listed in a catalogue which can be searched to indicate whether and where information is stored.
  • Librarians are professional people trained in organising such information, helping users find what they want and establishing the location of such material in their own library – or elsewhere.

This is put beautifully in this excerpt from Libraries are Essential:

 There is much more to doing real research than typing a few words into a search engine such as Google. Librarians are trained to do high-level research, which supports scientists, doctors, lawyers, professors, writers, government officials, and other important professionals every single day. Without the aide of librarians, all of these people would be making decisions without having all of the relevant knowledge they need on their topics.

 http://www.librariesareessential.com/why-are-libraries-essential/

Conductive Education libraries

 Libraries and librarians may seem an easy target when financial cuts are to be made, which means that valuable resources are not being exploited to the full. Conductive Education publications are limited in number and new, accurate material can be hard to find. Five years ago the Foundation for Conductive Education decided that it could no longer prioritise the expertise of a professional librarian for its library and recently the Pető Institute lost its librarian (I do not know whether a replacement has yet been appointed. Would not this be public information deserving of prioritisation?). Who is maintaining and developing these libraries now?

 I do not know.

SAHK in Hong Kong has a library but I do not think it is open access as the others are. A few years ago a ‘mobile’ library was established to be used by all the conductors and centres in New Zealand. Again I do not know if that is still a going concern.

As far as I know there are no other collections of any size other than personal ones.

The Virtual Library of Conductive Education

 In 2009 I started collecting information on items on the Internet and catalogued the details in the Virtual Library catalogue. This now  has a new format and an updated help page.Yesterday I spent time entering further details of material available on line into this catalogue.

 http://e-conduction.org/virtual-library-new/

I will post occasional lists of yet more items added here on this blog.

Other sources of information

Information about Conductive Education is now accessible via e-conduction’s website which acts as a knowledge portal leading people to blogs, books, unpublished material, and conductors’ workplaces:

 http://e-conduction.org/

Previous postings on libraries and information:

http://e-conduction.org/ceinformation/librarians-are-always-happy-to-help/

http://e-conduction.org/ceinformation/new-year-new-library/

http://e-conduction.org/ceinformation/232/

 

 

 

 

Celebrations

Yesterday I attended the Annual Awards Ceremony at the National Institute of Conductive Education. It was strange to go back after recent events, but great to be able to congratulate the ‘new conductors’, who I had helped in their research for essays and dissertations .

The programme of the day included several awards, celebrating a variety of achievements:

Qualified Conductor Status on the final year student conductors. There were four this year and they all have jobs to go to in North America and Germany. One was unable to attend, as he had already started work.

The Founder’s Award is given by Andrew Sutton in recognition of vital help and support given to the Foundation for Conductive Education, (especially in its early years) in particular, and Conductive Education in general. Three people who had to be annoymous for a variety of reasons, were remembered this year and Andrew intimated that these may be the last from the past.

Volunteer’s Award is given to an individual who has worked tirelessly for the organisation helping with fundraising, marketing and administration. This year it went to Pauline Hartley who has given her time freely in such ways for seven years.

Long Service Awards are given to staff who have worked for five, ten and fifteen years. Three people had a five year award this year – a conductor, a conductive assistant, and the current Chief Executive.

Speeches were made, photos taken, bucks fizz drunk, and a good time had by all.