Andrew Sutton

Conductive Education gets a mention

I have frequently asked for more to be published about Conductive Education and today I see that mention has been made of it in a ‘proper’ refereed journal, Developmental Medicine and Child Neurology.

Andrew Sutton has blogged about a letter he and Rony Schenker have written in response to an article published about research which made an ‘apparently authoritative judgement on Conductive Education’. But not in a good way.

The blog posting, which includes the reference to the original research article,   can be found at

http://www.conductive-world.info/2014/03/intellectual-cut-and-thrust_24.html

Hong Kong hiccups cured

After posting  about the publication of Conductive Education Press’ latest book , Last year in Hong Kong we discovered there were some  problems which meant copies could not be ordered.

This has now been rectified and you are now able to order copies from Blurb at

http://www.blurb.com/bookstore/detail/2826466

Please do let us know what you think of it. All comments welcome!

New book On Conductive Education just published

 Last Year in Hong Kong; four presentations made to the 7th World Congress for Conductive Education, Hong,Kong, December 2010. 

Andrew Sutton
Conductive Education Press, December 2011
ISBN: 978-0-9569948-3-7

A brief introduction on the back cover reads:

In December 2010 the Seventh World Conductive Education Congress was organised by SAHK in Hong Kong. The theme of the Congress was ‘ East meets West: adaptation and development’.
Starting in Hong Kong but now across mainland China, ‘Oriental Conductive Education’ is making enormous, vigorous strides, not simply in terms of the numbers of children (and adults) and their families served, but also in research studies undertaken and apparent official and professional approval. Most significantly, this appears to be developing along a separate line from that of ‘Western Conductive Education’.
This progress may have important lessons and implications not just for the future development of Conductive Education in the West but also for its further adaptation to the needs of the South
Andrew Sutton made four contributions to this conference, gathered together here in this single publication. In the Foreword, Ivan Su Yuen-Wang, Corporate Programme Coordinator, SAHK writes
‘This Congress might have provoked controversy if those disposed to believe that there exists a new face of Conductive Education might have taken issue with others who think otherwise. We have to remember that change is not always easy. Time must elapse, to soften the animosities and deaden inertia. I recognise Andrew’s creative intention to give balance to his views on Conductive Education in the 21st century by including the ‘China perspective’. Throughout, he has discussed what has been accomplished in the West, what has been done in the East, and what in his opinion should be done in the future. I cannot overemphasise the great importance of the forward-looking pragmatic aspect of his views, with its gems for bringing prosperity to the world of Conductive Education.’

This new book is now available  for £8.00 plus postage and packing from  Blurb at   http://www.blurb.com/books/2806207

Conductive Education Classic no.7

Background
This book, the first comprehensive overview of Conductive Education in English, was written mainly because Cottam and Sutton, as working academics, needed to publish a book. Regular publications such as journal articles and books are expected of those working in the world of academe. Both having recently come across Conductive Education, and considering it an important system for those with motor disorders, it was an obvious choice for both and resulted in this collaboration.
It was published in 1986, twenty three years ago and was consciously an ‘academic book’. The publisher, Croom Helm, was an adventurous young publishing house that would take on unlikely subjects in the expectation that some at least would be runners and accepted it straight away.
It was hoped that it would attract academic interest in the project proposed by the Birmingham Group and pre-dated the Foundation for Conductive Education by nearly 12 months. In the event Standing up for Joe ( the BBC TV documentary) created a wider interest and sales of the book rode on that. The proper academic interest never really took of, but lots of parents and practitioners bought the book (though it was not really directed to them).
Sales were good for an academic book of that kind and it went to three reprints in a couple of years. In 1988, Croom Helm asked whether the authors would permit a fourth, but they declined. Two years on into the project Cottam and Sutton already knew so much more about Conductive Education , so different from what all previous people had known, that they knew it to be not just out of date, but wrong in important respects.
Contents

To quote from the back of the book:

It describes the origins and development of Conductive Education in Hungary and its derivatives in Britain and elsewhere and how the system operates in practice. The difficulties of successfully applying Conductive Education outside Hungary are considered and discussed. The book includes a bibliography of all materials published in English on this topic and assesses both the prospects and limitations of Conductive Education.

It is divided into three parts with contributions from Andrew Sutton, Philippa Cottam, Jayne Titchener and Veronica Nanton.
Part one looks at the social-historical context and the practice as observed by Andrew Sutton.
Part two covers the practice outside Hungary and discusses the suitability of Conductive Education as an approach for the physically and mentally handicapped.
Part three looks at the problems and prospects in bringing it to the West and includes a chapter on Parkinson’s disease.

A bibliography of all relevant known publications is included and many of these are still referred to today.

Reviews

It wasn’t widely reviewed. Academics tended to like it. professionals less so, but numbers were too small to generalise. Copies of these reviews are available in the National Library of Conductive Education.

This book is only one academic review of the whole phenomenon and is now over twenty years out of date, but holds a very important place in the development of knowledge about Conductive Education outside of Hungary.

Cottam, P. and Sutton, A., ed. (1986) Conductive Education; a system for overcoming motor disorder. London: Croom Helm.

Standing up for Joe BBC 1, April 1988.
http://www.conductiveeducationinformation.org/2009/06/conductive-education-classics-no6.html